A Sneaky Way To Get Past The Blank Page And Be More Prolific

When you format your articles this way, they practically write themselves.

Cathy Goodwin
4 min readOct 23, 2019

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Photo by Yannick Pulver on Unsplash

Awhile back I share one of my favorite content creation guidelines: “Don’t write ANYthing unless you can use what you write at least 3 times!”

An attorney on my email list replied, “Repurposing sounds great. But how do I get enough time to write the content in the first place? And frankly, I don’t enjoy the writing process at all…especially if it’s about me.”

Being a “prolific writer” can sound like a goal for someone else…about as likely as becoming a pro basketball player or ballet dancer.

But being prolific doesn’t require you to be born with talent or invest thousands of hours in practice. Many professional writers learn techniques to improve both quality and quantity of their writing.

Being a prolific writer comes with a nice payoff. You create a presence on the Internet. Even when you go on vacation, you’re still attracting signups and sometimes clients. If you know your stuff, you become a thought leader. People react when they see your name: “Oh, you’re the person who…”

So to start, think of the ways you write easily and effortlessly. For instance, let’s say someone sends you an email. You probably have no trouble replying. And you probably don’t experience the slightest bit of writer’s block.

Another way to write marketing content as effortlessly as you write a note to a good friend: associate each content creation challenge with a story.

Today’s Content Creation Challenge: Demonstrate your expertise without bragging.

Do you hate to write about yourself? If so, you’re in excellent company. Even seasoned business owners — even copywriters! — hate to write about themselves.

For this challenge, try the Advice Column hack. Advice columns have been around for over 100 years because people like to read about other people’s problems. The New York Times — a staid, serious newspaper — now has several Q&A columns about such topics as resolving ethical dilemmas, making career decisions, dealing with quirky social situations, and more. These columns have become immensely…

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Cathy Goodwin

Create a compelling marketing message that attracts your ideal clients through your unique selling story. http://cathygoodwin.com